Mindfulness

Buddhist Mindfulness and the True Purpose of Conflict


A Buddhist Model of Conflict Resolution and Mindfulness

 

By Jorg Thonnissen | Hypnotherapy In Perth 1/30/2011

 

We know conflict can exist as a state of opposition between persons or ideas or interests. But what about the internal kind of conflict that we are experiencing almost every day within ourselves? The practice of Nichiren Buddhism explains the true purpose of conflict, and how to deal with it effectively to get better outcomes. Being aware of the true nature of all phenomena as identified by the concept of ichinen- sanzen and expressed in the Buddhist chant Nam-Myoho-Renge-Kyo is the key to maintaining effective mindfulness.

“Bhikkhus, this is the one and the only way for the purification (of the minds) of beings, for overcoming sorrow and lamentation, for the cessation of physical and mental pain, for attainment of the Noble Paths and for the realization of Nibbana (Nirvana). That (only way) is the four satipatthanas. What are these four? Here (in this teaching), bhikkhus, a bhikkhu (a disciple) dwells perceiving again and again the body (kaya) as just the body (not mine, not I, not self, but just a phenomenon) with diligence, clear understanding, and mindfulness, thus keeping away covetousness (i.e. greediness) and mental pain in the world; he dwells perceiving again and again feelings (vedana) as just feelings (not mine, not I, not self but just as phenomena) with diligence, clear understanding, and mindfulness, thus keeping away covetousness and mental pain in the world; he dwells perceiving again and again the mind (citta) as just the mind (not mine, not I, not self but just a phenomenon) with diligence, clear understanding, and mindfulness, thus keeping away covetousness and mental pain in the world; he dwells perceiving again and again dhammas (i.e. “Nature”, or, “the way things really are”) as just dhammas (not mine, not I, not self but just as phenomena) with diligence, clear understanding, and mindfulness, thus keeping away covetousness and mental pain in the world”

Siddhartha Gautama – Buddha (approx. 544 B.C.E.)

“The mind is inherently empty – it doesn’t start and doesn’t end anywhere.
For reasons of simplicity, imagine emptiness being like water – imagine belief to be a vessel. The mind takes on the shape of the vessel it is provided with. However, even though the mind is empty, the Buddha’s teaching points out that it is nevertheless subject to the universal law of Myoho-Renge-Kyo. For ‘Self’ to exist, mind needs boundaries, through setting boundaries ‘Ego’ and ‘Identity’ are born.
What do you want to be? That is life’s constant quest. It is a creative process that never ends”.

Jorg Thonnissen (2010)

Last updated by at .